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A High-End Mudroom

We have done work for them before. Their home is large and very well appointed. When you first enter the house from their garage, you pass through this small room before taking the stairs up to the main floor. The New England states have their share of rainy and snowy days so they wanted this to be a mudroom. It would have cabinetry to keep their hats & coats, gloves & boots AND they wanted this space to be every bit as rich looking as the rest of their home. They care about their place, have very good taste and I’d always found them a pleasure to work for.

As our previous projects had turned out well, they asked me to design everything from scratch. I elected to create wainscot to wrap the walls & climb the stairs… and to have it blend well with the built-ins.

Here is my sketch recommendations for the wainscot. It shows two panel configurations, an elevation profile and the detail of the ‘cap’.

 

Here’s a shot of the wainscot where a vent needed to be incorporated

 

 

This is the rendering for a closet to hang coats with baskets to store gloves, etc. and a seat to put on/remove shoes with a lift top for storage beneath. I wanted to use a ornate cast-iron bracket to act as a corbel for the cantilevered top section. Also notice how the lower section works with the wainscot.

 

 

And here it is after painting (although without the mirror & other wall hangings)

 

 

They decided that we’d need more shoe storage so we added this a third of the way into the project. Here is that sketch…

 

 

This is how the paneling looked climbing the stairs

 

 

Here is a wide angle shot to give you a better sense of the overall look / clicking on this shot will bring it to full size…

 

 

I’ve built larger projects and quite a few incorporating more detail but this is a favorite of mine. I really like how these built-ins work with the wall panels …as much as anything else I’ve had the pleasure of making.

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.

 

Fireplace Bookshelves with Wood Storage

This is the same client (friends, actually) for whom we constructed an exterior door  (see oldest post here- ‘A Castle’s Exterior Door’… at the bottom of the page).
Anyway, this stone house was built over 75 years ago and we believed the old tongue and groove pine was original. Nice old wood but it made the living room a bit gloomy and she wanted to brighten and ‘clean up’ the look. They wanted to keep the stone fireplace and redo everything else.

We designed low shelving for that wall, the wall to it’s left and included a place for cord wood ‘waiting it’s turn’ to heat the house. It was a bit pricey so we eliminated the shelves returning on the left wall and… got to work.

The paneling was removed to expose the studs, the walls sheet-rocked, the stonework re-chinked, floors sanded / urethaned and the walls painted before installing the bookshelves.

We installed all the finish woodwork including some wider molding for the windows (more ‘old-world’ look to work with the stone). All painted white for a nice contrast. I fabricated some thick, oak, quarter round molding for the hearth’s edge as it sat 2″ above the floorRather than build the whole cabinet deeper, I elected to simply extend the floor of the cord wood opening. We protected it’s interior by lining it (floor, walls, ceiling and back) with sheet metal. I’m interested to see how this will stand the test of time.

I usually like the look of very old wood but it’s not quite so special when everywhere you look, you see nothing but walls of dark wood. I think this room is vastly improved… as our friends, all along, believed it would be.

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.

 

 

 

Architectural Detailing for a Foyer

A few years back, an interior designer who brings us work from time to time, asked us to further ‘decorate’ her client’s foyer. When we left the job, it wasn’t painted so I hadn’t really seen the end result. (We recently went back there to grab a few photos for ourselves).
Central to this foyer were a pair of ‘mirrored’ staircases. Though good looking in their own right, she wanted to raise the bar even further so we faced the adjacent walls in wainscot.

Every time I see one of those old movies filmed in the interior of a ‘grand estate’… I’ll sometimes see hallways with arched ceilings that have been paneled. It is a look that kills me. Absolutely great looking. Not many homes are built this way anymore.
And then an opportunity showed up (albeit, on a more humble scale AND these passageways were arched already… but we enjoyed paneling them anyway). Since it was a paint job, we simply applied frames to the walls and ceilings (which became the panels). This also makes the project more affordable.

Having a few photos of this work can help convince others to consider this kind of approach.

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.