Archive

Photographing the Difference – Final Picture Group

This is my third and final post about before & after pictures. This could be considered ‘during and after’ pictures as a fewof them are half way towards completion but… you get the idea. IFor what it’s worth, this isn’t a blog about photography. I’m simply trying to show how our woodwork can improve the places we live & work in. (It’s hard enough to find the time to go back a month later to photograph some work after it’s painted, much less be able to spend three hours lighting & dressing ‘the set’.)  Hell, I’m even showing some that were shot & sent to us by the client.
Anyway…
These first two pics show a section of the front of my house before & after painting. The white on white had become grungy looking (not to mention boring) so we went with a beige and did all the trim in a dark green. An understanding of color and a ‘fresh coat’ can really renew a setting.

Here we made a custom vanity for a very skinny bathroom. It needed to hold their sink, enclose a cast iron radiator & provided some open shelving. The way we had to make these cabinets in order to 1) be small enough to come up a very small, turn of the century stairwell 2) fit around all the existing plumbing and 3) leave access to all the valves… was somewhat disconcerting… but the interior decorator (Cottages to Castles, Inc.) & client were very pleased when all was finished.

I really should go back & try for a better shot of this arbor. The final shot was taken at night with pool lights… hence the grainy look. I designed a rather different looking arbor here. Although difficult to explain, the placement off this arbor in the backyard’s corner required me to give up a basic rectangle with the opening on one of it’s sides (which would have made it’s construction simple). and create one that was open on one of it’s corners. The pair of rafters running up the center are fastened to a pair of rafters running parallel to the pool house’s face though attached from underneath. Not your typical arbor construction.We created the panels at the bottom of the posts to enrich what would have simply been posts otherwise. After the painting was accomplished, it all ‘came together’ nicely we thought.

The next two are of my own foyer where I removed a cast iron railing and found a salvaged, old Victorian banister made from solid walnut (well over 100 years old) that I got at one of those huge flea markets / I had to do some retro fitting & make two additional newels for the upper landings. All those spindles were dovetailed into the tread’s ends. This has improved the look of our foyer ten fold.

Lastly is a wainscot and coffer-ed ceiling adornment we did for a client’s rather formal dining room. This required that we perform furniture quality work ‘on-site’. We created all the walnut panel, coffers, installed the trim and had our finisher come in and stain it all to this very dark value. A louvered vent was fabricated (of walnut) in one of the corners to handle the home’s central air.
A large dinner party was thrown two weeks thereafter and the owners expressed their pride to me… which in turn, of course, made me proud.
My sons and I did fairly meticulous work in this good sized home (calling it a mansion wouldn’t be much of a stretch) and there isn’t a single seam to be seen where all these pieces of solid walnut join one another. We love being commissioned to do high-end work, … projects that allow us to show what we can do.

And I’m glad we have the pictures to prove it.

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc. – 1/10/13

 

 

How to Make a Family Room for the Whole Family

Our client’s family (two adults and three children) wanted a room in which all their different activities could take place. Their TV and stereo components, video games, the computer(s), the home’s business area, library shelving and additional storage (for all those small things that would clutter every surface if not put away)… were all incorporated into the plans for these built in cabinets… Our plan was to create a room that had a place for everything and look great at the same time.
Although they wanted built-ins that were richly appointed, they expressed their wish to maintain the appearance of ‘hand wrought’ craftsmanship. I knew they didn’t want ‘rustic’, but I felt that perfectly straight-grained, ‘select’ boards and veneers wouldn’t portray enough character for their tastes.
So… we decided use cherry but made sure to include some great looking imperfections, so you might get a sense of the actual trees from which this furniture was made.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve included my renderings so you can appreciate how our plans became realized.

 

where the children do their homework

 

 

 

 

 

 

her antique desk sits in front of this piece that has 5 hanging-file drawers

Although labor intensive, the right details make a world of difference.

full beading on vertical corners, side walls paneled

 

create a thicker counter top with a routed profile

 

We’ve done many built-ins that were difficult to get a good picture of…
…and there are some that just seem to be made for it.

 

click on this master shot for full screen / it's crystal clear, 4,368 pixels wide

With smart design, honest craftsmanship… and a great client… it’s hard to go wrong.

Russell Hudson / 4-12

 

 

 

A Thoroughly Modern Kitchen

They were an older couple and made an apartment from the top floor of her daughter’s home. They took the largest room upstairs, turned half into a living room and the other half for the kitchen. This enabled me to stand in living room and capture a good shot of the whole kitchen. Few projects are like that and it’s one of the reasons I have this photo displayed on the gallery of our website.
They had thought long and hard about how they wanted it laid out and he, having been an engineer, drew the floor plan. They also said it was to be very modern and blond in color. I’d love to take sole credit for the design of this beauty but, I’m happy having gotten the job amongst three bids (and simply helping with it’s design).
Here is the room all prepped before installation…

before cabinetsAs all the cabs had toe-kicks, we built our bases (2X4′s), leveled them and began placing each cab in place.

first cabinets inMy son, Brian, working on the island (notice the quarter-round glass shelves on left)

modern kitchen island being installedNotice the roof pitch (ceiling slant) that required we make cabs with slanted tops to which the crown molding had to be wrapped at an angle. The ‘crown’ was simply ‘one by’ material so we increased the height of the piece on the face compared to the side runs. My elder son (Russell) is contemplating something in the background.

modern cabs with a slantHere is the first picture after completion. You’ll notice the island’s counter made of contrasting strips of hardwood. You can see the stove top’s highly stylized vent hood. It was important to get a beauty because it was so prominent.island counter top of different woodsHere is a shot of the island from behind. We maintained a continuous veneer for the doors and drawer fronts in a clear finished maple. All were mounted over-lay with long, thin chrome pulls.

modern kitchen islandHere you can see the left side of the kitchen and the effect of the glass shelves (which are on the right side as well).

stylish modern kitchenThe cabinets on the far right and left are open shelved from behind, though you can barely see it (opposite the fridge). The coffee maker, toaster, can opener, etc. are there for easy access. This frees up counter space and keeps the kitchen looking clean and orderly. Our client is in the background. ( I interrupted her making dinner when I stopped by to photograph)ultra modern kitchen islandThis makes a handsome master shot. The track lighting is very cool looking and if I’d had a slightly wider lens, I could have shown the glass shelves on the right and left sides. Maybe I’ll go back and photograph the kitchen again some day. Might even make a nice, short film for the video page on our site.

kitchen of the futureRussell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.

 

Deadhead Sinker Cypress: A Reclaimed Resource

5020988483 06ac12438f Deadhead Sinker Cypress: A Reclaimed Resource

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.  That has become the mantra of ecologically conscious people everywhere.  At Good Millwork, we think a fourth R should be added:  Reclaim.  There are resources waiting to be used that can be reclaimed from the water that covers them.

Deadhead sinker cypress lies at the bottom of rivers and canals.  It has already been cut, so there is no guilt about cutting forests involved in using it.  There is difficulty and danger in raising the wood, but things that are worth while are rarely easy to obtain.

Once raised and dried out, the wood is cut into boards.  Because it is rot resistant, deadhead sinker cypress can be used for siding or in decks and other outdoor applications.  It is ideal for humid locations such as much of the Gulf Coast.

Deadhead sinker cypress is good for other things, though.  It can be made into banisters, newels, and rails for a staircase.  Cabinets out of cypress look very nice, as well.  Wooden floors look and feel very nice.  Cypress can put up with heavy traffic and keep looking nice for whole lifetimes.

The only drawback to deadhead sinker cypress is that it is not all that commonly available.  You cannot go to your local hardware store and purchase it.  However, at Good Millwork, we have a good stock of deadhead sinker cypress and can mill it to your specifications.  All you need to do is call us, and we can get the process started.  Call today.

Have Questions? Contact us or call (888) 209-9307