Archive

Stair Landing Display Cabinets

Our client had a stairwell running up through the center of his house. On one of the landings, he had a wall with 22” of unused space behind it and wanted display cabinets sunk into the wall. We treated it much like a fireplace mantle as he wanted a very rich looking face and surrounding woodwork.

We were to design, build and install the unit. It had to match what mouldings existed there already.

Here’s a early construction pic in the shop / notice that the columns, left & right, sit on the sheetrock and the cabs run deeper, back within the wall. My son, Brian did the majority of the build. By the time he’s my age, he will have passed me in his grasp of this skill.

IMG_2673

We added the top (which was to act as a shelf) and primed it.

display cabinet wall insert

Here it is installed…

IMG_1265

Once the paint was finished, the knobs were attached & the glass inserted…. our client sent me this finish shot as he was so pleased.

stair landing cabinets

I thought it looked pretty good too…….

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, inc.

 

Murphy Bed Install

He had just bought a high-end townhouse overlooking the Hudson River. He wanted to have a foldaway bed (Murphy Bed) in the guest room.
A niche existed in the wall already so I had to determine whether a Queen sized Murphy bed would fit.

space for Murphy bed

I did a simple drawing showing how I wanted the bed’s bottom to be paneled and included storage cabinets above as we had the room for it.

Murphy bed panel rendering

I usually build a piece an inch less wide than the spot it is to go …to compensate for inaccuracies in the walls, floors, ceilings. I did some research of various hardware kits available. I only wanted the metal parts that allow it to swivel up & down and the mechanism to lock it into it’s closed position …with everything else about the bed, custom made by us.

IMG_0399

As small as I could make this foldaway bed to hold a queen sized mattress, we ended up with only an eighth of an inch on each side. Too close for comfort.

Here is a 17 sec video of my son demonstrating how it works right after we installed. You’ll notice that the locking mechanism utilizes two small plaques that when lifted upward, not only unlock the bed from it’s vertical position but also act as support legs when it arrives at it’s horizontal position. So that the plaques looked like they were there for a reason, we mounted a clothes hook on each.

Leslie Gustafson & Co. (interior design) worked with us for this and a number of other projects we accomplished for him before he moved in. I’ll be posting three other blogs of projects for this same client. Stay tuned….

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, inc.

 

A Hand Made Kitchen

My eldest son now does carpentry & construction with a good outfit but he learned his woodworking skills as a cabinetmaker in our shop. They got a job redoing a kitchen six months back & he used our shop to make the cabinetry.

Here is his layout being rendered… (the only part I did)….

drawing #1

drawing #2

He knows how to both build well and achieve great detail. Here are three pics of the island being assembled…

island

corbels

stepout 45 degree corner

They wanted the counter in a dark color & he suggested using walnut rather than trying to stain maple very dark. This addition was pricey but looked ‘killer’ when installed.
These pics show the 2” solid walnut planks & how he treated the outside edge…

aligning walnut boards

large nose & cove

counter top assembled

These finished shots are a tad soft in focus but you can see how handsome it turned out.

master behind island

master best angle

russell hudson / hudson cabinetmaking, inc.

 

Designing a Mission Style Fireplace Mantle

They had a mantle made by the carpenters who trimmed out their place a number of years back. It was essentially three boards with molding applied to the face & a shelf. Like many facades, it lacked substance and girth.

They wanted a mantle that was substantial but had clean, bold lines, no fine detail or filigree. I rendered a corner of the proposed piece that I felt had those qualities. It ended up as ‘Mission Style’, in  appearance.

DSCN6040

Here is a shot of one of the columns being assembled…

0609142218a

We wanted to appreciate that it was made from wood but to stain it very dark… so I was able to use poplar & maple ply.

arts n crafts mantle

As I write this post, we have just finished doing two rooms in wainscot & a wine storage wall unit for them, all in the same style. Seems they liked the way it turned out.

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.

 

Designing a Mission Style Fireplace Mantle

They had a mantle made by the carpenters who trimmed out their place a number of years back. It was essentially three boards with molding applied to the face & a shelf. Like many facades, it lacked substance and girth.

before

They wanted a mantle that was substantial but had clean, bold lines, no fine detail or filigree. I rendered a corner of the proposed piece that I felt had those qualities. It ended up as ‘Mission Style’, in appearance.

DSCN6040

Here is a shot of one of the columns being assembled…

column from base

We wanted to appreciate that it was made from wood but to stain it very dark… so I was able to use poplar & maple ply.
As I write this post, we have just finished doing two rooms in wainscot & a wine storage wall unit for them, all in the same style. Seems they liked the way it turned out.

finished mantle

russell hudson / hudson cabinetmaking, inc.

 

Building and Installing Wainscot

The house was over a hundred years old and was situated in a very up-scale neighborhood. Any investment in a good quality, home improvement was a wise one.

Their dining room & foyer, staircase & hallway… were the first places that were seen when you entered their home. We were asked to build wainscot to adorn all of these walls.

They wanted a more formal, frame & (raised) panel wainscot, not simply bead board with a cap, as seen in many ‘turn of the century’ country homes. We created a sample of the wainscot 34″ high but only 4″ wide  … based on their approval of the final profile drawing (showing the cap & base sections).


We had three radiator covers to make. Each had to ‘ fit ‘ within the wainscot very well … (both in terms of size & style). We first created the covers faces in the shop and sealed them well, backside & front.

 

 

 

I usually do a drawing of the frame & panel placement right on the walls. This verifies the sizes of the panels to be made back in the shop  …but it also helps the client to envision what this ‘wall covering’ will look like. This becomes even more critical for those diamond-shaped panels climbing the staircase.  Here are 2 shots of the staircase being installed.

 

 

 

Our installation time was somewhat limited so we began installing panels while our painter began placing a final coat on those sections already completed. Here are two walls in the dining room freshly done.

 

 

 

The only way to see the whole job is to show this short video I managed to grab when I returned two weeks later to do another project for them. The good work payed off, it seems.

http://youtu.be/imOwgRz07P4

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking

 
 
 

Making a Sunroom (From a Screened-in Porch)

I’ve written here before about creating removable wall screens for our porch. My wife enjoyed this screened-in area so much she eventually asked if we could create a wall of glass so we could enjoy this south facing ‘room’ in the winter, as well.

This is a shot of the porch’s exterior, during winter (when we used to stack firewood there).

 

 

We ended up deciding on very large windows …making the entire wall, almost all glass. Three, 5 foot high by 6 foot wide slider windows with invisible screens for summer… will maintain that outdoor feeling. We positioned them 2′ off the floor so the top edge  came within a foot of the ceiling (for maximum sunlight).

I did a rendering so my sons & I were all on the same page before we began construction….

 

new sunroom wall construction

 

…. we framed-out the new wall, faced it with exterior ply & wrapped with moisture barrier. Then we removed all the clapboard from the three interior walls.

 

 

we saved the old clapboard to cover the new exterior wall

 

Next we had to create a new floor (8 inches higher than the existing stone floor). This would make the floor warm in the winter, make it level with the adjacent kitchen floor & create a space for the vent pipe for our clothes dryer’s exhaust from the basement. We covered the old stone floor with tar paper, placed joists (to raise the floor) and filled  each slot with insulation and covered with two layers of 3/4 inch plywood (extra rigid for a tile floor). We then inserted the three big windows, insulated & sheet rock’d the interior walls.

 

the room will be warm & dry, this way

 

a 'wall of glass' is what makes a sunroom

 

 

We left the two existing windows (on what used to be the outside of the house) so that some daylight still made it through the sunroom and into our livingroom…. Now that I had a total of five windows and a doorway to surround with molding, I decided to make my own casing …as I wanted it’s shape to be clean & simple but really substantial in size. I used 5/4 inch by 8 inch and 3/4 by 6 inch boards & rounded all the outside edges. Here’s a pic of my sketches and two more of the casing getting installed & painted.

 

front views on the bottom & a profile sketch above (turn counter-clockwise to see in upright position)

 

 

 

We decided a tile floor would be best for a sunroom and found what looked like the floor from a century old Santa Fe building.

 

 

Once the floor was installed, we added the base molding and a crown molding. We hung a ceiling fan and mounted wall sconces at each end of the room. We painted the walls & trim the same color (so the molding’s shape stood out) and we covered the ceiling with a mixture of half white and half wall color (not as stark a contrast, walls & ceiling look better this way) and finally, filled the room with some comfortable chairs, etc.

 

 

a little busy but finally done

 

The view out the windows is all foliage with a few bird houses … /  everybody loves hanging out there now.

I’m glad I put the time in. Increased the value of our home too. A ‘win-win’.

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.

 

An Exquisite Interior

I don’t usually post a blog of another’s blog but the sheer volume of labor involved in this building had my head spinning.
Houses of worship (churches, synagogues & mosques) are most aften the premier  examples of the man’s most elaborate architectural work but… this was, actually, one of the first Loew’s movie theaters / it is located in Queens, NY

The Queens Movie Theater You Will Not Believe

 

 

« Older Entries