Archive

A Faster Way to Assemble a Roorkee

Roorkee chairs are great fun to show customers – until they ask me to take it apart and put it back together for them. For the first year or so, I was pretty slow at putting them together because there are eight buckles to tighten up all while keeping the loose parts from falling down like a Jenga game. After thinking about it and working with the chairs for three […]

The post A Faster Way to Assemble a Roorkee appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

2 Ways to Warm up For Dovetails (Without Cutting One)

My dovetails are always at their best if I warm up before sawing. But I’ll be honest – when I am pressed for time I have no patience to cut an entire joint, much less prep the wood for a practice set. So here are two things I do to get my sawing on track that don’t require extra material or significant time. Crosscut Your Rough Stock by Hand Even […]

The post 2 Ways to Warm up For Dovetails (Without Cutting One) appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

How to Impress the General Public with Your Woodworking

The following blog entry might seem snarky. I assure you it is not. I’m interested in what impresses people when they view a piece of furniture. In fact, when a fellow woodworker shows off a piece of furniture, I observe the other people in the room as much as I observe the piece itself. So here is a short list of things that seem to really impress. Big Furniture To […]

The post How to Impress the General Public with Your Woodworking appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Building and Installing Wainscot

The house was over a hundred years old and was situated in a very up-scale neighborhood. Any investment in a good quality, home improvement was a wise one.

Their dining room & foyer, staircase & hallway… were the first places that were seen when you entered their home. We were asked to build wainscot to adorn all of these walls.

They wanted a more formal, frame & (raised) panel wainscot, not simply bead board with a cap, as seen in many ‘turn of the century’ country homes. We created a sample of the wainscot 34″ high but only 4″ wide  … based on their approval of the final profile drawing (showing the cap & base sections).


We had three radiator covers to make. Each had to ‘ fit ‘ within the wainscot very well … (both in terms of size & style). We first created the covers faces in the shop and sealed them well, backside & front.

 

 

 

I usually do a drawing of the frame & panel placement right on the walls. This verifies the sizes of the panels to be made back in the shop  …but it also helps the client to envision what this ‘wall covering’ will look like. This becomes even more critical for those diamond-shaped panels climbing the staircase.  Here are 2 shots of the staircase being installed.

 

 

 

Our installation time was somewhat limited so we began installing panels while our painter began placing a final coat on those sections already completed. Here are two walls in the dining room freshly done.

 

 

 

The only way to see the whole job is to show this short video I managed to grab when I returned two weeks later to do another project for them. The good work payed off, it seems.

http://youtu.be/imOwgRz07P4

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking

 

& Write Tool Reviews, Part 4">How I Read & Write Tool Reviews, Part 4

If you haven’t figured it out, I’m wary of tool reviews in magazines or online. With rare exception they are uninformed or (worse) misguided. And believe me: I am the first to admit that I was uninformed and misguided when I started writing and editing these reviews in the 1990s. In my experience, Milquetoast reviews are not the result of malice. They are the result of several things. Readers want […]

The post How I Read & Write Tool Reviews, Part 4 appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

A Basque Planing Support

There are lots of ways to get around not having a sliding deadman – sometimes called a “board jack” – on your workbench. For the last 15 months I have been working on a bench without a deadman or a tail vise, so I am always looking out for novel solutions. This weekend a woodworker named Adrian from Toronto sent me some photos of a clever bench accessory he spotted […]

The post A Basque Planing Support appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

& Write Tool Reviews, Part 3">How to Read & Write Tool Reviews, Part 3

For experienced woodworkers, it’s easy to ignore tool reviews and say: “I just buy the brands that have served me well.” But what if you know little about the different brands? When I was growing up, Skil made fantastic circular saws. Black & Decker made good drills. Craftsman put its name on some good machinery. Delta was unassailable on the quality of its table saws and band saws. Are those […]

The post How to Read & Write Tool Reviews, Part 3 appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

How I Read Tool Reviews (And Write Them), Part 2

Most tool reviews aren’t really reviews. They’re press releases dressed up with a lab coat and a clipboard to look respectable. For experienced woodworkers, these faux-reviews are easy to spot and ignore. What are the signs? They’re missing key information about the tool’s place in the market compared to its competitors. Even more telling, the writer wields statistics to discuss the tool (14.4-volt batteries with an intelligent trickle-charger) but omits […]

The post How I Read Tool Reviews (And Write Them), Part 2 appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

How to Read a Tool Review (And How I Write Them), Part 1

If I never write another tool review, I’ll be happy. But due to changes at Popular Woodworking Magazine, I’ve agreed to write a few for upcoming issues. Because I like nothing better than to pull down my pants and walk around in public, here is a guide to reading (and writing) tool reviews. Before I start, let’s dispel some myths about tool reviews. Only Consumer Reports does it the right […]

The post How to Read a Tool Review (And How I Write Them), Part 1 appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Why You Should Work with a Blacksmith

Up until 1999, I didn’t think it was even possible to get blacksmith-made hardware for my furniture pieces. Today I rarely build a piece that doesn’t have some part that was made by a blacksmith or whitesmith. In 1999 my then-boss Steve Shanesy took me to a blacksmith in Cold Spring, Ky., named Marsha Nelson. I spent an afternoon photographing her work and was amazed at how quickly she could […]

The post Why You Should Work with a Blacksmith appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.