Archive

Threadboxes: One More Song the Radio Won’t Like

Whenever I write about threadboxes, my personal blog gets swamped with spam from the Pacific Rim. So batten down the firewalls, mateys. I started writing about the Moxon double-screw vise in 2010 (original post here) and have made many of them using a threadbox and tap that you can buy from many reputable woodworking stores. My first threadbox worked fine until it needed sharpening. The blade was so brittle that […]

The post Threadboxes: One More Song the Radio Won’t Like appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

& Woodworking in America">About Me & Woodworking in America

It’s a strange world where I need to write a blog entry about this topic. Recently Editor Megan Fitzpatrick and I have been getting e-mails and phone calls with this basic question: “Why isn’t Schwarz going to Woodworking in America?” Then they ask: • Is it because Popular Woodworking Magazine doesn’t want him there? • Is it because I don’t want to attend? • Is Chris finally getting that gender-changing […]

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The Monogamy has Ended

When I teach people to sharpen edge tools, I am very much an “I’m OK, you’re OK” guy about the kinds of systems out there and whether you should use jigs or not. But there is one thing I’m all fire and waterstones about: Stick with one system until you know it – at least 12 months. I call it “sharpening monogamy.” I also practice “saw monogamy” and the regular […]

The post The Monogamy has Ended appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

It Floats. It’s Full of Stars….

I have lost track of how many vises I’ve built or installed on workbenches. So my early-morning giddiness about the Benchcrafted Crisscross is worth note. This week I’m putting a leg vise on my Holtzapffel workbench that will have both the new Benchcrafted Classic vise screw and the Crisscross Retro (instead of a parallel guide). I’ve used vises with the Crisscross installed, but this is the first Crisscross I’ve installed […]

The post It Floats. It’s Full of Stars…. appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

AW Extra 5/22/14 – Hang a Router….Perfectly

Hang a Router....Perfectly

Surfire router plate installation

By Jennifer Feist

 

Are you tempted by the benefits of owning a router table plate but hesitate to take the plunge because of the hassles involved in mounting it in your table? That’s understandable because a poorly fit router table plate leads to endless frustration.A loose fit makes it impossible to maintain a consistent distance between your bit and fence. A plate that’s set too high or too low in the rabbet creates catch points for stock and makes depth-of-cut settings difficult. Fortunately, you don’t have to put up with these headaches. Here’s how to correctly install the plate for peak performance.

If you’re still worried about approaching your immaculate tabletop with a screaming router, do what I did and practice the procedure on a piece of scrap first.You’ll need a pattern bit (Photo 1), a jigsaw, a drill,double-stick tape and some 1-in.-thick stock. (The 1-in. material can be made from built-up sheet stock.)

 

1. Choose a pattern bit with the same radius as the corners on your router table plate.

Click any image to view a larger version.

 

 

2. Make an exact template using your plate as a guide.We used 1-in.-thick stock to accommodate the depth of the bit and the bearing (Photo 3). Double-stick tape works great for holding the boards in place without making holes in your router table top.

 

 

3. Set the bit depth using a template board and your plate as a guide.The depth-of-cut equals the thickness of the template boards plus the thickness of the plate.

 

 

4. Rout the rabbet after adding support boards for the router base to the middle of the cutout.

 

 

5. Rough cut the opening with a jigsaw. Be sure to support the cutout so it can’t break off before the cut is finished. Predrilling the corners helps start the cut and makes cutting the corners easier.

 

 

Accurately Centering the Router on the Plate

If you want to use template guide bushings with your router table plate, the router must be mounted dead-on center, and that’s not easy.

Rousseau has developed a baseplate mounting system that’s simple and accurate. The bit includes a centering disc, alignment pin, longer mounting screws and pointed tapping screws that accurately mark where to drill your plate.This system works with any plate that accepts 1-3/16-in. guide bushings. Priced at $5, it’s well worth the headaches it saves!

 

 

Sources

Note: Product availability and prices are subject to change.

Hartville Tool, hartvilletool.com, 800-345-2396, Top-Bearing Pattern Bits: # R3004, 1/2-in. dia.; Double-Stick Tape: #12638, 1 in. x 36 yards.

Rousseau Baseplate Mounting System, rousseauco.com, 800-635-3416.


This story originally appeared in American Woodworker February 2000, issue #85.

February 2000, issue #85

Purchase this back issue.

 

 

Loose Tenon Joinery

Loose Tenon Joinery

Rout 4 variations of these super-strong joints with a versatile shop made jig.

By Bill Hylton


I've used a number of different methods to create mortise and tenon joints, but I keep coming back to loose tenons, because they're easy, strong and versatile. Instead of cutting a tenon on one part and a mortise in the other, I rout identical mortises in both parts, and connect them with a fitted strip of wood—a loose tenon. Loose tenon joinery is perfect for casework, tables and doors of all sizes.

The only tools you need to start making loose tenon joints are a plunge router equipped with an edge guide, straight bits designed for plunge cutting and a mortising block—a shopmade jig I've designed that you can make in a day.The mortising block minimizes layout work and allows routing both edge and end mortises from the same router setup.

You can use off-the-shelf bits and just about any plunge router, but a precision edge guide is a must. I use the Micro-Fence edge guide, which I think is the best available (see Sources, below).

 

The mortising block

This jig holds the workpiece, supports the router and controls its movement (Fig. A, below).The jig consists of the mortising block itself, a top extension, an L-bracket and a clamp board for bench mounting.

The face of the block has dadoes and mounting-bolt holes for the two work holders—horizontal for edge mortising and vertical for end mortising. The router sits on top of the block and overhangs the workpiece.The router's edge guide is housed in a track formed by the L-bracket (Photo, opposite). Adjustable stop blocks set the mortise length.

 

How the jig works

• The jig's registration line locates the workpiece.

• The jig's L-bracket tracks the router and keeps the mortise aligned with the edges of the workpiece.

• The mortise's width is determined by the bit's diameter.To create mortises wider than the bit, you reposition the fence and make a second pass.

• The mortise's depth is controlled by the router's plunge mechanism.

• The mortise's length is governed by the jig's adjustable stop blocks.

• The mortise's lateral (side-to-side) positioning is controlled by the router's edge guide.

 

Build the jig

1.Mill stock for the main parts and cut the pieces to final dimensions (Fig. B, below).The mortise block's body and the horizontal work holder must be exactly the same length, because you reference from the ends to rout the vertical keyways.

2. Rout 1/4" deep vertical keyways in the mortising block and the horizontal work holder.

3. Rout single 1/4" deep horizontal keyways in the mortising block and the vertical work holder.The block’s keyhole is stopped.

4. Rout mounting-bolt slots in each work holder, using a plunge router and an edge guide.

5. Plane 1/2" thick stock to fit the work holder keyways. Cut pieces to length to create the keys. Attach them.

6. Clamp the horizontal work holder to the mortising block.Tap a 1/2" brad point drill at both ends of each slot to transfer its location to the block. Remove the work holder and scribe vertical lines on the block through the four points you marked. Clamp on the vertical work holder, mark the slots and scribe a pair of horizontal lines.

7.Drill holes for the work holder mounting bolts at the four points where the horizontal and vertical lines intersect.To secure the 3/8" bolts, I cut threads in the wood itself.To do this, drill the four holes with a 5/16" bit and use a 3/8"-16 tpi tap to cut the threads (see Sources).No cutting fluid is needed; just turn the tap into the hole, then back it out. Alternatively, you can use Tnuts or drive threaded inserts into the body to secure the bolts.

8.Glue and clamp the top extension to the mortising block. Clean off any dried glue after removing the clamps. Then joint the assembly to ensure that its top surface is square to the face.

9. Attach a 3/8" thick wood fence to your router's edge guide.Then size the L-bracket parts to create a groove that will house the fence.The fit should be snug, so the fence slides without any wobble.Glue the L-bracket parts together and install them.

10.Make both stop blocks from one long piece of 5/8" by 2-3/4" stock. Rout the 1/4" deep keyway and two mounting bolt slots. Cut the stops to final length.Make keys and attach them.

11. Rout matching keyways in the top of the mortising block.

12. Set the stops in place on the block and mark locations for mounting bolt holes.Drill and tap the holes for 1/4"-20 tpi bolts.

13. Install toggle clamps on the work holders (see Sources). I installed longer threaded spindles on all the clamps and used a 500-lb.size on the vertical work holder. Be sure to mount the clamps so they don't interfere with the router.

14.Draw a registration line centered on the face and top of the mortising block.

15.Glue on the clamp block.

 

Create the basic loose tenon joint

1. Lay out an edge mortise (Photo 1). It doesn't have to be elaborate, just lines marking the mortise ends and centerline. Only one line is essential: a centerline across the mortise. This mark aligns with the jig's registration line.

2.Position a test piece on the jig, using the horizontal work holder (Photo 2).

3.Adjust the work holder so the edge of the workpiece is flush with the jig's top. Line up the workpiece centerline with the block's registration line (Photo 3).Adjust the toggle clamps to hold the work securely.

4. Install a bit designed for mortising in the router.Up-spiral bits are popular these plunge cuts, but they're not essential.

5. Install the router on the jig and test-slide the edge guide's wood fence in the L-bracket groove. Apply wax, if necessary.

6. Bottom the bit onto the workpiece. Then move the router to center the bit on the mortise centerline (Photo 4). Lock down the edge guide and set the plunge depth.

7. Install the stop blocks to establish the length of the mortise (Photo 5).

8. Rout the mortise (Photo 6). That's all it takes. As long as the faces of the workpieces are oriented the same way on the jig, all the edge mortises routed with this setup will be the same, regardless of where they fall on the workpiece. Just scribe a centerline across each mortise, and align it with the registration line on the block (Photo 7). If all of the mortises are located in the same place on each workpiece, you don’t even have to mark them. Instead, just fasten a stop on the jig against the end of your test piece and use it to register the workpieces.

9.The only change you have to make to rout the matching end mortises is to switch work holders (Photos 8 and 9).

10.Mill loose tenon stock to complete the joint. First, plane a length of stock to fit the mortises. It should slip in without wiggling or binding. Rip the blank to width, slightly less than the mortises’ length.Next, round the blank’s edges to match the mortises. Then cut individual loose tenons from the blank.

 

Reinforce a cope and stick joint

Routed cope and stick joints look great, but their stub tenon construction may not be suitable for large cabinet doors. Adding loose tenons strengthens these joints.

Rout the mortises before you rout the cope and stick profiles, so you don't have to work around stub tenons on the ends of the rails. (The mortises won't interfere when you rout the profiles.) Center the mortises across the thickness of the workpiece.They probably won’t align with the stub tenons produced by the cope cuts, but that doesn’t matter, because everything will be hidden in the assembled joint.

Start with the end mortises.Offset them away from the rails' inner edges, so the panel groove won't cut into the mortises (Photos 12, 13 and 14). Locate the edge mortises in the stiles according to the rails' offset end mortises.

Be mindful of the rails' offset mortises when you rout the profile and panel grooves. It's all too easy to rout the wrong edge.

 

Twin mortise joints

In post-and-rail constructions made using thick stock, you can make stronger joints by doubling the loose tenons.The inside mortises on the posts of these corner joints will intersect, so they must be shorter; their tenons are mitered.The outside post mortises are deeper, so their tenons can be longer.The rail mortises can all be the same depth.

Orient the workpieces with their outside faces against the mortising block. Set up and rout the outside mortises.You'll have to change work holders when you switch from routing edge to end mortises. Reposition the bit and rout the inside mortises (Photo 15). Reduce the final plunge depth when you rout these mortises in the posts.

 

Loose tenon table joint

In this construction, the apron usually is inset from the leg faces.My approach is to set up for the mortises in the legs (Photos 16 and 17).To rout the aprons, I use double-faced tape to install a shim equal in thickness to the inset between the apron and the block (Photo 18).Be sure to install the aprons outside-face-in before routing their mortises.


Sources

(Note: Product availability and costs are subject to change since original publication date.)

Micro Fence, microfence.com, 800-480-6427, Micro Fence Edge Guide.

Buy Destaco, buydestaco.com, 800-560-9292, De-Sta-Co Horizontal Toggle Clamps, #215U; #225U (500 lb. cap.).

Tap and Die sets are available at hardware stores and home centers.


Fig. A: Loose Tenon Mortising Jig

Despite their name, loose tenon joints fit as precisely as traditional mortise and tenon joints, and are just as strong.


Fig. B: Dimensions

Mortising Block


Stop Block


Horizontal Work Holder


Vertical Work Holder


This story originally appeared in American Woodworker April/May 2009, issue #141.

April/May 2009, issue #141

Purchase this back issue.

Click any image to view a larger version.

Adapt your router to the jig by installing a fence on the edge guide that fits the slot formed by the jig's L-bracket.This keeps the bit aligned as the router slides back and forth. To move the bit laterally, you simply adjust the edge guide.


The Basic Loose Tenon Joint


1. Lay out one edge mortise on a test piece to set up the router and jig.The mortise centerline is used for positioning the workpiece on the mortising block—it's the only layout mark required for every mortise.


2. Set up the jig to rout the edge mortises. Install the horizontal work holder and position the test workpiece so its edge is flush with the top of the jig.Then tighten the bolts.


3. Align the work's mortise centerline with the jig's registration line.Then lock the test piece in position.


4. Install the router and adjust the edge guide to center the bit on the work.Then adjust the router's plunge-depth stop to the desired mortise depth.


5. Install the stop blocks. Move the router to one end of the mortise and align the bit's edge with the layout mark. Slide the stop against the router and tighten the bolt. Set the second stop the same way.


6. Rout the mortise with a series of shallow cuts. Plunge the bit about 1/8", feed quickly to the far stop, retract the bit, return to the starting position and go again.


7. Mark your stocks' outside faces and always orient the same face against the mortising block when you rout. Once all the edge mortises are routed, switch to the vertical work holder to rout the end mortises.


8. To mount the vertical holder, clamp a workpiece with its mortise centerline aligned with the jig's registration line. Slide the holder against the workpiece and tighten the bolts.


9. Install the router and rout the end mortise. The length, width, depth and placement of the mortise don't change when you switch work holders.


10. Size a loose tenon blank. Plane a length of stock to fit the mortises. It should slip in without wiggling or binding. Rip the blank to width, slightly less than the mortises' length.


11. Round the tenon blank's edges to match the mortises.Then use a crosscut sled to cut individual loose tenons from the blank.


Reinforce a Cope and Stick Joint


12. This variation requires offsetting the rail mortises, so they don't interfere with the panel groove. Lay out the offset mortise on a pre-routed rail.Then use this rail to position the vertical work holder.


13. Rout the mortises before you rout the cope and stick profiles.Your initial set-up positions the mortise in only one end of each rail, because both ends of the rail must be routed with the same face against the block.


14. To position the mortise in the other end, install a shim equal to the panel groove's depth between the work stop and the rail.


Twin Mortise Joints


15. Rout twin mortises in two steps. Lay out and rout the first mortises in both the edges and ends. Reposition the bit for the second mortises and go again. Always orient the same face against the fence.


Table Joint

 

16. With table joints, the aprons are usually inset from the legs.Start by mortising the legs. Clamp the leg with its outside faces against the block and the work-holder.Position the bit, set the stops and rout the mortise.


17. Flip and rotate the leg to rout the second mortise. It doesn't matter that the leg now extends in the opposite direction, because the mortises are centered on the jig's registration line.


18. To inset the aprons from the legs, you offset their mortises by the amount of the inset. Attaching a shim of the desired thickness to the jig automatically offsets the mortise correctly.

 

5 Mistakes Beginners Make with Block Planes

When I teach beginners, one of the most common phrases I hear is, “I cannot get this (insert tool name) to work. What’s wrong?” They hand the tool to me and the fun begins. Though block planes are dirt-simple handplanes, there are some important points about them that are rarely discussed in the literature. Here are the five most common problems I see with students’ block planes. 1. Too tight. […]

The post 5 Mistakes Beginners Make with Block Planes appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

AW Extra 5/15/14 – Precision 3-Wall Scribes

Precision 3-Wall Scribes

A simple template guarantees a perfect fit.

By Brad Holden

 

Fitting a countertop between two side walls and a back wall is one of the most challenging installations you will ever face. Experienced cabinetmakers can do this with ease by marking and scribing straight to the countertop, but they have years of experience. I take a more roundabout approach, but it’s virtually goof-proof.

I prefer to make a template of the opening and rout my top to match. This prevents trimming too much from any side, which would create a gap that can’t easily be repaired. I’ll show you a simple method for making this template using a kitchen desktop that butts against a cabinet, a side wall and a back wall as an example. I installed this desktop with no backsplash. If you intend to install a backsplash, you don’t need a precise scribe on the back edge.

 

Materials

You’ll need a piece of plywood or MDF slightly smaller than the countertop opening—about 1/4 in. less at each side and the back is sufficient. This board will be your template’s base and will rest on top of the base cabinets or wall cleats. You’ll also need three guide boards of any 1/4-in.-thick material. Cut them about 4 in. wide. Make two a couple inches longer than the countertop’s depth and one a few inches shorter than the countertop’s width.

 

Make the template

Lay the template base on top of the cabinets or cleats and temporarily secure it with a couple of screws (Photo 1). Position one guide board on either the left or right end and push it up against the side and back wall (Photo 2). Next, you’ll need a washer whose rim is big enough to span the widest gap between the wall and the guide board. Put your pencil tip in the washer’s hole and draw a line on the guide board, letting the washer follow the wall’s contour (Photo 3). Clamp the guide board to your workbench, and use a belt sander to sand down to the line (Photo 4). Check the fit against the wall. When you’ve got a snug fit, screw the guide board to the template (Photo 5). Repeat the same steps on the guide boards on the other side and on the back. Cut the back guide board so it fits between the two side guide boards.

Make a mark on the side guide boards to indicate where you want the front edge of the countertop to line up (Photo 6). Then, remove the template assembly and set it on the countertop to be trimmed. Line up the marks you made with the front edge of the countertop, and clamp the template in place (Photo 7). Note: Build your countertop about 3/8 in. larger in width and depth than the opening.

 

Rout the top

Using a top-bearing pattern bit with a cutting length at least 1-1/2 in. long, trim around the template (Photo 8; see Sources, below). Stop short of the front left corner so you don’t blow it out, and carefully finish the cut with a belt sander (Photo 9).

Tilt the countertop into place (Photo 10). It should fit snugly, but if it’s too tight, you may need to adjust the fit slightly. To do this, reattach the template slightly off center and rout the exposed edge to gain a little clearance. If you follow these steps carefully, you’ll end up with a perfect fit.

Click any image to view a larger version.

1. Three-wall scribes are tricky because both ends and the back of the countertop all have to fit snugly. My technique removes most of the difficulty by starting with a loose-fitting template base. I’ll scribe three guide boards, one for each wall, and screw them to the template base.


2. Position the first guide board on the template base by sliding it up against both the side and back wall. It must be long enough to overhang the front of the template base by a couple of inches.


3. Along the side and back wall, mark a scribe line on the guide board using a pencil and a small washer. The washer follows any bumps or curves in the wall. Repeat this step with a second guide board on the other side.


4. Clamp the guide board on your workbench and carefully sand to the pencil line. When you’re done, check the fit against the wall. The beauty of this method is that if the fit’s not quite right, you can just mark and sand again.


5. Screw the scribed side guide boards to the template base. Mark, sand and attach the back guide board last, because it butts between the two side guide boards.


6. Mark both side guide boards at the exact point where you want the front edge of the countertop located. This mark will be used to accurately align the guide boards on the countertop.


7. Use a square to align the countertop’s front edge with the marks on the side guide boards. The countertop must be slightly larger than the template assembly.


8. Rout the countertop’s finished shape using a topbearing pattern bit. Start at the countertop’s front right corner and rout counterclockwise.


9. Stop routing short of the front left corner and use a belt sander to remove the remaining material. This prevents the router bit from chipping out the front edge. A piece of masking tape provides a clear mark where to stop sanding.


10. Tilt the counter into place. Fasten it with screws from underneath through the top of the base cabinet. A wood cleat screwed to the right-hand cabinet supports this top on the right side.

 

Source

Note: Product availability and prices are subject to change.

Router Bit World, routerbitworld.com, 800-630-2260, Amana Top bearing 3/4-in.-dia. plunge bit, #45465.


This story originally appeared in American Woodworker February/March 2007, issue #127.

 

 

AW Extra 5/15/14 – Precision 3-Wall Scribes

Precision 3-Wall Scribes

A simple template guarantees a perfect fit.

By Brad Holden

 

Fitting a countertop between two side walls and a back wall is one of the most challenging installations you will ever face. Experienced cabinetmakers can do this with ease by marking and scribing straight to the countertop, but they have years of experience. I take a more roundabout approach, but it’s virtually goof-proof.

I prefer to make a template of the opening and rout my top to match. This prevents trimming too much from any side, which would create a gap that can’t easily be repaired. I’ll show you a simple method for making this template using a kitchen desktop that butts against a cabinet, a side wall and a back wall as an example. I installed this desktop with no backsplash. If you intend to install a backsplash, you don’t need a precise scribe on the back edge.

 

Materials

You’ll need a piece of plywood or MDF slightly smaller than the countertop opening—about 1/4 in. less at each side and the back is sufficient. This board will be your template’s base and will rest on top of the base cabinets or wall cleats. You’ll also need three guide boards of any 1/4-in.-thick material. Cut them about 4 in. wide. Make two a couple inches longer than the countertop’s depth and one a few inches shorter than the countertop’s width.

 

Make the template

Lay the template base on top of the cabinets or cleats and temporarily secure it with a couple of screws (Photo 1). Position one guide board on either the left or right end and push it up against the side and back wall (Photo 2). Next, you’ll need a washer whose rim is big enough to span the widest gap between the wall and the guide board. Put your pencil tip in the washer’s hole and draw a line on the guide board, letting the washer follow the wall’s contour (Photo 3). Clamp the guide board to your workbench, and use a belt sander to sand down to the line (Photo 4). Check the fit against the wall. When you’ve got a snug fit, screw the guide board to the template (Photo 5). Repeat the same steps on the guide boards on the other side and on the back. Cut the back guide board so it fits between the two side guide boards.

Make a mark on the side guide boards to indicate where you want the front edge of the countertop to line up (Photo 6). Then, remove the template assembly and set it on the countertop to be trimmed. Line up the marks you made with the front edge of the countertop, and clamp the template in place (Photo 7). Note: Build your countertop about 3/8 in. larger in width and depth than the opening.

 

Rout the top

Using a top-bearing pattern bit with a cutting length at least 1-1/2 in. long, trim around the template (Photo 8; see Sources, below). Stop short of the front left corner so you don’t blow it out, and carefully finish the cut with a belt sander (Photo 9).

Tilt the countertop into place (Photo 10). It should fit snugly, but if it’s too tight, you may need to adjust the fit slightly. To do this, reattach the template slightly off center and rout the exposed edge to gain a little clearance. If you follow these steps carefully, you’ll end up with a perfect fit.

Click any image to view a larger version.

1. Three-wall scribes are tricky because both ends and the back of the countertop all have to fit snugly. My technique removes most of the difficulty by starting with a loose-fitting template base. I’ll scribe three guide boards, one for each wall, and screw them to the template base.


2. Position the first guide board on the template base by sliding it up against both the side and back wall. It must be long enough to overhang the front of the template base by a couple of inches.


3. Along the side and back wall, mark a scribe line on the guide board using a pencil and a small washer. The washer follows any bumps or curves in the wall. Repeat this step with a second guide board on the other side.


4. Clamp the guide board on your workbench and carefully sand to the pencil line. When you’re done, check the fit against the wall. The beauty of this method is that if the fit’s not quite right, you can just mark and sand again.


5. Screw the scribed side guide boards to the template base. Mark, sand and attach the back guide board last, because it butts between the two side guide boards.


6. Mark both side guide boards at the exact point where you want the front edge of the countertop located. This mark will be used to accurately align the guide boards on the countertop.


7. Use a square to align the countertop’s front edge with the marks on the side guide boards. The countertop must be slightly larger than the template assembly.


8. Rout the countertop’s finished shape using a topbearing pattern bit. Start at the countertop’s front right corner and rout counterclockwise.


9. Stop routing short of the front left corner and use a belt sander to remove the remaining material. This prevents the router bit from chipping out the front edge. A piece of masking tape provides a clear mark where to stop sanding.


10. Tilt the counter into place. Fasten it with screws from underneath through the top of the base cabinet. A wood cleat screwed to the right-hand cabinet supports this top on the right side.

 

Source

Note: Product availability and prices are subject to change.

Router Bit World, routerbitworld.com, 800-630-2260, Amana Top bearing 3/4-in.-dia. plunge bit, #45465.


This story originally appeared in American Woodworker February/March 2007, issue #127.

 

 

Making a Vise Chop for a Benchcrafted Classic

I started making the wooden vise chop for a new leg vise for my Holtzapffel workbench (featured in “The Workbench Design Book”) using some crazy new hardware from Benchcrafted: the Classic vise screw and the Crisscross. The only downside to the Crisscross part of the assembly is that you need a vise chop that is quite thick – 3” is a good thickness. I don’t have any maple in my […]

The post Making a Vise Chop for a Benchcrafted Classic appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

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