Archive

12 Things About Working Teak

12 Things About Working Teak

1. Your house will smell like Pier 1 2. Because of teak’s waxiness, your machines will be able to take only about one-fourth of their usual cut. Teak bogs everything down. 3. When handplaning it, you cannot position your cap iron close to the iron’s edge. The waxy shavings gum up the works. Ditto on … Read more »

The post 12 Things About Working Teak appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Getting Bit by the Toothed Planing Stop

Getting Bit by the Toothed Planing Stop

I know there are people who use edge tools straight out of the box, but I can’t. I always sharpen them. So why should workbench accessories be any different? For many years I’ve been indifferent to metal planing stops. The aluminum ones are terrible for too many reasons to even get into here. The iron … Read more »

The post Getting Bit by the Toothed Planing Stop appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

A Jack Plane with a Rounded Sole

A Jack Plane with a Rounded Sole

When preparing stock by hand, the most useful plane is probably the jack plane (sometimes called the fore plane among joiners). Its curved iron allows you to remove a remarkable amount of material with every stroke. I usually travel with a metal jack (an old Stanley No. 5) because it’s less intimidating in a classroom … Read more »

The post A Jack Plane with a Rounded Sole appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Visiting the Wellspring of Campaign Furniture

Visiting the Wellspring of Campaign Furniture

This week I’m in England doing research for my next book, “Campaign Furniture,” and spent today geeking out with Sean and Simon Clarke of Christopher Clarke Antiques – the world’s leading dealer of campaign antiquities. The Clarke brothers have handled thousands of pieces of campaign furniture built during two centuries of the peak of the … Read more »

The post Visiting the Wellspring of Campaign Furniture appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Learn to Lay Out an Ogee

Learn to Lay Out an Ogee

In the November issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine, you’ll find my 6-Board Chest article. The opening photo (shown below) shows three chests – mine (the blue one), Tim Henricksen’s (the yellow one) and Ty Black’s (the green one). My chest (the one I teach you how to build in the article) has an ogee on … Read more »

The post Learn to Lay Out an Ogee appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

An Even Trade

I asked my friend how much he’d want to stain our deck and he said he had a better idea….

He has a small apartment and needed a computer center that also had some shelving for books, etc.

He already had a glass table top he wanted to make use of and there was a little used corner he thought would be a perfect place for it. As luck would have it, this corner’s back wall had a protruding 10″ deep ledge. and was at an acceptable height for our ‘desk’

This meant, in order for us to support the glass top, I only had to build a single lower cab to support the left side and simply attach a cleat on the right hand return wall to support THAT side of the top.

As the glass was only 42″ wide along it’s front edge, I had to build this cabinet somewhat narrow to allow a comfortable width for the sitting area.

So we made it only 12″ wide and I included a small drawer at the top. For fun, I made a hidden pocket on the backside of that drawer.

Then we made the shelving section, to sit above the counter, against the back wall.

He took a bar stool he already had and painted all three pieces to match.

I’ll build him a small swing out arm on the right hand wall to mount his monitor on so it can be swiveled out of the way when not in use.

I don’t think these photos will adorn the pages of ‘Fine Home Building’ magazine but… he’s a happy guy… & my deck is protected from the elements for another couple of years. Like a lot of ‘trades’ (no cash involved), this was a win-win.

 

Defective Dovetail Diagnosis

Defective Dovetail Diagnosis

When I teach woodworking, most of my job is diagnosing defective dovetails. Tail walls that are not 90°. Floors of pin and tail boards that have lumps aplenty. My diagnosis tools are my sensitive fingers, a small square and my eyes. But in some situations, all of those tools fail. When cutting dovetails with skinny … Read more »

The post Defective Dovetail Diagnosis appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Dovetails of 472 Flavors

Dovetails of 472 Flavors

If you think there are hard-and-fast rules about designing dovetails, don’t read any further. You’ll get an ulcer. North Carolina woodworker Mark Firley has collected a set of 472 photos of dovetails on antiques that he has collected in his travels all over the United States. Sift through this set, and you can find almost … Read more »

The post Dovetails of 472 Flavors appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

The Notched Batten – a Great Workbench Trick

The Notched Batten – a Great Workbench Trick

Traversing boards without a tail vise can be tricky. For the last eight years, I’ve used a setup that requires two holdfasts and a batten between them. It works fine, but it requires a long batten and two holdfasts to work. Workbench builder Richard Maguire published a tip on his blog this summer that allows … Read more »

The post The Notched Batten – a Great Workbench Trick appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Curse You IKEA! (And a Dovetail Dodge)

Curse You IKEA! (And a Dovetail Dodge)

While my kids (and wife) are fans of the IKEA, I remain non-committed to the Swedish meatball and presswood furniture empire. But today a little part of me died. I fell in love with an IKEA product. The JANSJÖ is a gooseneck LED lamp that is perfect – perfect – for bench work. It costs … Read more »

The post Curse You IKEA! (And a Dovetail Dodge) appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.