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5 Bowsaws Later

5 Bowsaws Later

I leave for Germany in a couple weeks to teach classes on making Roorkhee chairs (piece of pie!) and bowsaws. Yup. Making bowsaws. You’ve probably seen my international treatise on bowsaws: “Bowsaws: An Anthropological View of Three Sticks and Some Cat Innards.” No? Well that’s because I haven’t written it. I’ve used and owned many … Read more »

The post 5 Bowsaws Later appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

5 Bowsaws Later

5 Bowsaws Later

I leave for Germany in a couple weeks to teach classes on making Roorkhee chairs (piece of pie!) and bowsaws. Yup. Making bowsaws. You’ve probably seen my international treatise on bowsaws: “Bowsaws: An Anthropological View of Three Sticks and Some Cat Innards.” No? Well that’s because I haven’t written it. I’ve used and owned many … Read more »

The post 5 Bowsaws Later appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Salvaged Seattle Chinatown Pavers

Just in time for summer projects we are blowing out our reclaim Chinatown pavers. These make great walkways, firepit surrounds, fireplaces, driveways, ect. All the pavers were salvaged from downtown Seattle's Chinatown streets. These are not bricks, they are pavers so they were built to withstand the weight of heavy traffic. We have sold about half of the 50,000 pavers we originally salvaged so we have about 25,000 left. They are $1 per paver which is half of the price of the first 25,000 sold. They have been used in numerous high end homes and driveways and are a great conversation piece. Recently Mastercraft Masonry used them to build one of our customers a rustic brick fireplace and pizza oven - check out the picture below. 
 

Salvaged Seattle Chinatown Pavers

Just in time for summer projects we are blowing out our reclaim Chinatown pavers. These make great walkways, firepit surrounds, fireplaces, driveways, ect. All the pavers were salvaged from downtown Seattle's Chinatown streets. These are not bricks, they are pavers so they were built to withstand the weight of heavy traffic. We have sold about half of the 50,000 pavers we originally salvaged so we have about 25,000 left. They are $1 per paver which is half of the price of the first 25,000 sold. They have been used in numerous high end homes and driveways and are a great conversation piece. Recently Mastercraft Masonry used them to build one of our customers a rustic brick fireplace and pizza oven - check out the picture below. 
 

Do You Need More Roughage?

Do You Need More Roughage?

At one of the woodworking schools where I teach there is a quote hanging on the wall that has always bugged me a bit. I’ll paraphrase it: In 100 years, people will only care WHAT you did, not HOW you did it. Whenever I read that quote, all I can think about what the first … Read more »

The post Do You Need More Roughage? appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Easy-to-make, Screened in Porch

We have an alcove on the outside of our home. It sits on one side of the house tucked in, underneath the second story above and has a slate floor. If it had enough windows, you might considerate it a sunroom. We also have a fireplace in the living room and a wood burning stove in the kitchen… so it ended up being the perfect place to store 2 to 3 cords of wood (so I wouldn’t have to march out in the snow to get a couple of logs twice-a-day). … but it became little used during the summer. My wife said she’d love to have a screened in porch but I didn’t want to give up the perfect firewood storage area. So… I pondered how I might build a screened wall, 7 ft. high and almost 26ft long, that could be stored out of the way in the winter but put into position during the summer. Three – 8&1/2 ft sections would be made of 2X6’s (flat sides on the face) so that they were sturdy, fairly flat for storage & substantial in weight but not so heavy that they couldn’t be moved a few feet each spring & fall. This first picture shows the cordwood stacked for the upcoming winter. The rectangle you see between the two windows are the three wall sections stacked together. They occupy less that a foot of space (depth) from the alcove’s back wall.

 

doorway on right hand side wall (out of sight) lets me get wood within two steps of the house

Now that winter is over, this next shot shows the final wall screen being put into place. Each has two screws placed into the header above and each weighs more that enough to stay put along the floor even during the strongest of winds, people leaning on them, etc. The materials were very inexpensive and they were relatively easy to construct with very long stainless steel screws. Placing an additional rail at chair rail height made them all the more rigid and looked fairly handsome, I thought. They are almost ten years old now and as solid as the day I made them.

This last shot shows you our screened in porch with wall sconces that I installed at either end on ‘the room’ and how we’ve dressed it up for the warmer weather. Reading, writing, eating, napping, card games… we love this little room…. now year-round.

Russell Hudson / HCM 5/28/13

 

How to measure for replacement glass…just in time for lawn mower season! 

Picture
Every year around this time the sun starts peeping out from behind the rain clouds, the days get longer and the grass starts growing in Western Washington. This chain of events eventually leads to the dusting off of lawn mowers, weed whackers and garden tools in most yards across the Pacific Northwest. For small engine mechanics this is the busiest time of year and for window and glass companies it means more customers needing replacement units for windows damaged by flying rocks. Since I have already noticed an increase in the number of glass causalities this year I decided to put together a little how to tutorial on measuring glass for replacement units. Sure you can call a glass company to come out and measure up your windows for you. But, if you are handy you should be able to use this guide to help you measure the broken unit so you can install the new unit into your frame and save a bundle of money...which you can spend on getting your lawn mower tuned up or new flowers for the garden. Of course if you get lucky and end up breaking the vent (operable part of an opening window) you are welcome to bring the whole vent into the store so we can measure it for you. 

Step 1: Remove the snap bead from the outside of the window. 

I use a flat head screw driver or putty knife to wedge between the frame and the snap bead. After you get it loose it should pull right out. The snap bead does help keep the glass in place, but your window should also be secured with double stick glazing tape so don't worry about the glass falling out. 

2. Measure the glass unit using the raw glass edge. 

The raw edge can be sharp so be careful on this part. Measure the unit from edge to edge and get as exact as possible. Write the measurements down as you go. There is no standard and the measurements have to be pretty exact. When recording the measurements always record width x height. 

Step 3: Measure the thickness of the glass unit 

Every window manufacturer and series have different glass thicknesses so again there are no standards although they usually come in 1/4" increments. To measure the thickness of the unit without breaking the glazing tape seal we slide a business card in between the frame and the unit and mark the card along the edge of the glass. We then measure the distance from the edge of the card to the line to get our overall thickness. 

Step 4: Determine LowE Type 

Depending on the age of your window it may or may not have LowE Glass. If your window was manufactured prior to 1990 it is unlikely that it has LowE. However, if your window was manufactured after 1990 then it may have either a hardcoat or softcoat LowE (there are others but these are the two most common). To tell whether a window has LowE you will look for a slight green (softcoat) or purple (hardcoat) tint. If you can't tell, we recommend putting a piece of white paper behind the glass to help make any tint more noticeable  If the glass you are replacing stands alone then it isn't as important that the LowE matches the rest in your house. However, if you are only replacing one side of an operable window and the LowE doesn't match one side may look darker/lighter than the other. 

Step 5: Check for Tempered Glass Label 

If your window shattered when it broke it is probably tempered (safety) glass. If your window broke in large chucks it is probably annealed. However, if your window didn't break and your are replacing the unit for another reason (fog between the panes, ect) then you may not know. All tempered glass should be labeled with a stamp in one of the four corners. Look for the stamp and note if it is tempered or not. There are building codes that require tempered glass in certain applications and it would be shame to have to reorder the same unit later down the road because you missed the tempered label. 
If you have any questions on the process please feel free to call us at 425-432-5189 (Maple Valley) or 425-888-5044 (North Bend). If you would like pricing for window units please call us with the above information. To order custom size glass we require a signature to confirm the sizes are correct since the glass can only be cut once. We can accept signatures via email, fax or in person. Good luck and happy mowing! :)
 

How to measure for replacement glass…just in time for lawn mower season! 

Picture
Every year around this time the sun starts peeping out from behind the rain clouds, the days get longer and the grass starts growing in Western Washington. This chain of events eventually leads to the dusting off of lawn mowers, weed whackers and garden tools in most yards across the Pacific Northwest. For small engine mechanics this is the busiest time of year and for window and glass companies it means more customers needing replacement units for windows damaged by flying rocks. Since I have already noticed an increase in the number of glass causalities this year I decided to put together a little how to tutorial on measuring glass for replacement units. Sure you can call a glass company to come out and measure up your windows for you. But, if you are handy you should be able to use this guide to help you measure the broken unit so you can install the new unit into your frame and save a bundle of money...which you can spend on getting your lawn mower tuned up or new flowers for the garden. Of course if you get lucky and end up breaking the vent (operable part of an opening window) you are welcome to bring the whole vent into the store so we can measure it for you. 

Step 1: Remove the snap bead from the outside of the window. 

I use a flat head screw driver or putty knife to wedge between the frame and the snap bead. After you get it loose it should pull right out. The snap bead does help keep the glass in place, but your window should also be secured with double stick glazing tape so don't worry about the glass falling out. 

2. Measure the glass unit using the raw glass edge. 

The raw edge can be sharp so be careful on this part. Measure the unit from edge to edge and get as exact as possible. Write the measurements down as you go. There is no standard and the measurements have to be pretty exact. When recording the measurements always record width x height. 

Step 3: Measure the thickness of the glass unit 

Every window manufacturer and series have different glass thicknesses so again there are no standards although they usually come in 1/4" increments. To measure the thickness of the unit without breaking the glazing tape seal we slide a business card in between the frame and the unit and mark the card along the edge of the glass. We then measure the distance from the edge of the card to the line to get our overall thickness. 

Step 4: Determine LowE Type 

Depending on the age of your window it may or may not have LowE Glass. If your window was manufactured prior to 1990 it is unlikely that it has LowE. However, if your window was manufactured after 1990 then it may have either a hardcoat or softcoat LowE (there are others but these are the two most common). To tell whether a window has LowE you will look for a slight green (softcoat) or purple (hardcoat) tint. If you can't tell, we recommend putting a piece of white paper behind the glass to help make any tint more noticeable  If the glass you are replacing stands alone then it isn't as important that the LowE matches the rest in your house. However, if you are only replacing one side of an operable window and the LowE doesn't match one side may look darker/lighter than the other. 

Step 5: Check for Tempered Glass Label 

If your window shattered when it broke it is probably tempered (safety) glass. If your window broke in large chucks it is probably annealed. However, if your window didn't break and your are replacing the unit for another reason (fog between the panes, ect) then you may not know. All tempered glass should be labeled with a stamp in one of the four corners. Look for the stamp and note if it is tempered or not. There are building codes that require tempered glass in certain applications and it would be shame to have to reorder the same unit later down the road because you missed the tempered label. 
If you have any questions on the process please feel free to call us at 425-432-5189 (Maple Valley) or 425-888-5044 (North Bend). If you would like pricing for window units please call us with the above information. To order custom size glass we require a signature to confirm the sizes are correct since the glass can only be cut once. We can accept signatures via email, fax or in person. Good luck and happy mowing! :)
 

Look it Up or Suffer Under it: Resistentialism

Look it Up or Suffer Under it: Resistentialism

When I teach a woodworking class, I give my students free reign with my tools. It’s a great way for them to get a feel for tools that are sharp and in order. It’s also a great way to get a broken turning saw. During the last few years, students have destroyed my turning saws … Read more »

The post Look it Up or Suffer Under it: Resistentialism appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Shut up and Sharpen

I make it a point to avoid blogging about sharpening. It is the simplest thing to do that is made confusing by too much talk and too many commercial products. I honestly do not care how you sharpen your tools. If you can get a zero-radius intersection and then polish the two surfaces, then you … Read more »

The post Shut up and Sharpen appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

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