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Easy ways to make your exterior doors more secure

Home security is a major concern for many of our customers looking for new doors and windows. Statistics of home burglaries suggest that the most common point of entry is doors. Obviously, making sure your door locks are in working order and are utilized is one of the most important steps in keeping your home safe from intruders. In addition to locking your doors, we often suggest our customers consider adding the following upgrades to help keep your family and belongings safe. 
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1. Switch your door to an outswing door 
Outswing doors should all be prehung with security hinges to prevent unwelcome guests from removing the hinge pin from the outside. When hung with an non-removable pin hinge outswing doors create a more secure door. Outswing door thresholds (pictured left) have a hard stop on the inside that the door shuts against. Since the easiest way to breach a door is by kicking it in, the solid stop on the threshold makes the door significantly more difficult to kick in thus forcing them to either pry the door open (which is also easier if the door swings in) or yank them open, which would be difficult if relying on pure manpower.

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2. Install a Security Plate 
I security plate like the one shown reinforces the jamb so the jamb doesn't easily splinter and break. The security latch is installed between the jamb and the 2x4 or 2x6 frame. Make sure to use extra long screws when installing the latch plate and security plate so that they tie the jamb and 2x4 or 2x6 together creating a more solid framework. The $10 investment could be well worth the money spent should a thief attempt to break in. 

3. Choose a door with strategically placed glass
Glass doors can be aesthetically pleasing letting natural light into your home, however, they may not be the safest doors available. For home owners who are concerned with door security I usually recommend a door without glass or a door with glass that is placed high enough so that if it is broken, the deadbolt and lock are not reachable. Craftsman style doors are my favorite choice because they are stylish yet practical in terms of home security. 
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4. Install Deadbolts 
This one is easy! Never buy an exterior door without a deadbolt. Deadbolts are longer and stronger so they are far better than the standard locks. Many homeowners insurance policies now require that all exterior doors are equipped with deadbolts so make sure you have one. At the Millwork Outlet we are in the business of making sure our customer's homes are safe and beautiful so our door shop NEVER charges for a double bore!

 

Easy ways to make your exterior doors more secure

Home security is a major concern for many of our customers looking for new doors and windows. Statistics of home burglaries suggest that the most common point of entry is doors. Obviously, making sure your door locks are in working order and are utilized is one of the most important steps in keeping your home safe from intruders. In addition to locking your doors, we often suggest our customers consider adding the following upgrades to help keep your family and belongings safe. 
Picture
1. Switch your door to an outswing door 
Outswing doors should all be prehung with security hinges to prevent unwelcome guests from removing the hinge pin from the outside. When hung with an non-removable pin hinge outswing doors create a more secure door. Outswing door thresholds (pictured left) have a hard stop on the inside that the door shuts against. Since the easiest way to breach a door is by kicking it in, the solid stop on the threshold makes the door significantly more difficult to kick in thus forcing them to either pry the door open (which is also easier if the door swings in) or yank them open, which would be difficult if relying on pure manpower.

Picture
2. Install a Security Plate 
I security plate like the one shown reinforces the jamb so the jamb doesn't easily splinter and break. The security latch is installed between the jamb and the 2x4 or 2x6 frame. Make sure to use extra long screws when installing the latch plate and security plate so that they tie the jamb and 2x4 or 2x6 together creating a more solid framework. The $10 investment could be well worth the money spent should a thief attempt to break in. 

Picture
3. Choose a door with strategically placed glass
Glass doors can be aesthetically pleasing letting natural light into your home, however, they may not be the safest doors available. For home owners who are concerned with door security I usually recommend a door without glass or a door with glass that is placed high enough so that if it is broken, the deadbolt and lock are not reachable. Craftsman style doors are my favorite choice because they are stylish yet practical in terms of home security. 

Picture
4. Install Deadbolts 
This one is easy! Never buy an exterior door without a deadbolt. Deadbolts are longer and stronger so they are far better than the standard locks. Many homeowners insurance policies now require that all exterior doors are equipped with deadbolts so make sure you have one. At the Millwork Outlet we are in the business of making sure our customer's homes are safe and beautiful so our door shop NEVER charges for a double bore!

 

The Milkman’s Workbench in Use

The Milkman's Workbench in Use

The Milkman’s Workbench – a portable bench I built for the June 2013 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine – is about 653 percent better than my first workbench. Thanks to the clever engineering in the portable bench, it can handle most handwork tasks when clamped to a dining room table or kitchen countertop. My first … Read more »

The post The Milkman’s Workbench in Use appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

‘Milkman’s Workbench’ Without Screws

‘Milkman’s Workbench’ Without Screws

The portable “Milkman’s Workbench” from the June 2013 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine has attracted a lot of attention, judging from the e-mail piling up in my Inbox. The No. 1 question: How can I build the bench without wooden bench screws? One answer: wedges. Reader Ilkka Sivonen of FInland built the bench without wooden … Read more »

The post ‘Milkman’s Workbench’ Without Screws appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

German Workbench: Artistic License or Pure Genius?

German Workbench: Artistic License or Pure Genius?

I’ve collected tons of drawings of old workbenches, during the years, and most fall into two categories: 1. A typical workbench with typical vises that looks like lots of other workbenches. 2. Workbenches that were drawn by an artist that have vises that would never work and that are put in stupid places where vises … Read more »

The post German Workbench: Artistic License or Pure Genius? appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Pedestrian Bridge

They lived in Ardsley, NY… which is a fairly well-to-do town less than an hour north of Manhattan.

Although this property, as it faced the road, was only 75 feet wide, it ran back almost 250 feet deep giving the owners quite a bit of land behind the house. The problem was that a little over half way back, a creek cut the property in two. The little ravine was 15 ft wide but fully 8 feet deep so getting to the rear section (behind the creek) was near impossible.

They needed a bridge… a pedestrian bridge which would allow easy access to the back section for lawn mowing, parties, throwing the ball around, etc.

I’m a cabinetmaker and during those rare times when I’m asked to make something whose structural integrity must carry the weight of people (decks, stairs, etc), I always make it much stronger & more substantial than I think it requires because a) I like the look and b) it will pass any safety test that way…

The following two renderings represented my vision for the bridge. I wanted an arbor over the walkway to which they would introduce vines. As the costs began to escalate, the client established a ceiling to the budget and I had to simplified the bridge (no arbor).

The following photos portray how we netted out. (For reference, my youngest son, Brian is almost 6’4″ tall.)

 

 

Two years later, the client confided in me that the project turned out so well, he wishes he’d payed the extra cost & included the arbor above.
Damn…. I would have loved to have built that original design…..

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.

 

 

Round Bench Dogs that Don’t Rotate

Round Bench Dogs that Don't Rotate

If there is one disadvantage to round bench dogs, it is that they can occasionally rotate as you are clamping something between two dogs or when you are planing against a single dog. It’s a minor annoyance, but it’s real. An Italian reader devised a very clever solution to this problem that is quick. I … Read more »

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& Glue in Canada">Toothbrushes & Glue in Canada

Toothbrushes & Glue in Canada

When in Canada, you do need to be careful about what you use your toothbrush for. At woodworking schools in the United States, a lot of them use a wet toothbrush to remove wet glue squeeze-out from the inside corners of a carcase. But when teaching a tool chest class at Rosewood Studio in Perth, … Read more »

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Portable Benches for Servicemen

Portable Benches for Servicemen

As my dad is a Vietnam vet, I’ve always had a soft spot for the men and women in the armed forces. So when I heard from several of them that they were interested in buying one of my portable workbenches, I thought I could do better than sell them something. I enlisted the help … Read more »

The post Portable Benches for Servicemen appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

 

Dogs for the ‘Milkman’s Workbench’

Dogs for the ‘Milkman’s Workbench’

Holy cow I mucked around a lot making the dogs for the portable workbench featured in the June 2013 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine. I made spring-loaded bench dogs (more complex than necessary). Dogs using a bullet catch (the right-size hardware wasn’t readily available at the home center). And when I considered casting the dogs, … Read more »

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