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Sneak Not: How to Cut Accurate Miters

Sneak Not: How to Cut Accurate Miters

“(E)xtreme care  is always requisite for proper mitring, in order that the beveled ends formed by sawing in the box may fit to form the angle required without planing, which is rarely done neatly enough to make a close joint and causes much waste of time.” — “How to Join Mouldings; or, The Arts Of Continue reading»

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Sneak Not: How to Cut Accurate Miters

Sneak Not: How to Cut Accurate Miters

“(E)xtreme care  is always requisite for proper mitring, in order that the beveled ends formed by sawing in the box may fit to form the angle required without planing, which is rarely done neatly enough to make a close joint and causes much waste of time.” — “How to Join Mouldings; or, The Arts Of Continue reading»

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Museum to Exhibit 20th-century Woodworking Icons

Museum to Exhibit 20th-century Woodworking Icons

Next month, the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, N.C., will open a shop of later 20th-century woodworking iconography titled: “Blood on the Adze: The Hegemony of Post-radicalist Disestablishmentarianism Among Followers of St. Roy.” The exhibit will showcase a number of objects that have recently been donated to the museum that shed new light Continue reading»

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Build a Tool Chest. Day 4: The Silent Day

Build a Tool Chest. Day 4: The Silent Day

The dovetailed skirt around the carcase of a tool chest (or blanket chest) is fussy to fit. The case has to be square and plumb. The skirting material has to be flat and square. And you have to get the joint’s baselines in just the right place. And even when you do all that, you Continue reading»

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Bottoms, Skirts and Pizza You Cannot See

At some point during a woodworking class, students, teachers and bystanders become a sort of ersatz family. It is not by design. It is despite my best efforts. Today at The Woodwright’s School, students dressed the shells of their tool chests and added the tongue-and-groove bottom boards (yay for cut nails). After that brief nailing, Continue reading»

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Day 2: The Shell is Assembled. And Yikes.

Day 2: The Shell is Assembled. And Yikes.

After two only days of work, nearly the entire class has assembled the shells of their tool chests. This is not according to plan. We are supposed to assemble the chests on Wednesday night. Late Wednesday. Dark. With greasy pizza boxes strewn everywhere. There should be tears. Alcohol deprivation. Hide glue. Instead, we have only Continue reading»

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Build (Another) Tool Chest

Build (Another) Tool Chest

When you’ve worked out of a traditional tool chest for 15 years, you sometimes forget how excellent it is to work from. That is, until you teach others how to build the chest. This week, I’m at Roy Underhill’s woodworking school, “The Woodwright’s School.” This is the last class I’m teaching in 2012 (aside from Continue reading»

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My Introduction to the ‘Polissoir’ – Roubo’s Wax Polisher

My Introduction to the ‘Polissoir’ – Roubo’s Wax Polisher

For most modern woodworkers, wax is not a finish. It goes on top of the finish and creates a barrier to scratches. But after reading the forthcoming translation of A.J. Roubo’s “L’Art du Menuisier,” it’s clear that wax was once a fast and beautiful finish for furniture. That is, when assisted with a tool that’s Continue reading»

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Cedar Vent Crafts

Here in the Pacific Northwest cedar is wildly popular. There is no other wood with the same great auroma, durability and beauty of cedar. When we got the opportunity to buy a whole lot of cedar vents we jumped at the chance. Obviously cedar vents are great for exactly what they are built for, venting buildings. However, with this many cedar vents at such great prices I couldn't help but wonder what other handy uses they have. I had a couple of ideas of my own and rather than building each piece to show I took to the internet to see if someone already had the same idea. When googling cedar vent craft, art, ect. I didn't come up with much. Then I used louvered door as my search phrase and came up with a few more pictures. What's great about cedar vents over louvered doors is that they can be used outside, they come in smaller sizes and have a wider variety of shapes which means you can use them without having to cut apart and reconfigure full doors. Below are some of my favorite ideas. If you are a DIY'er I would love to hear your suggestions and any pictures you might have. You can view a few of the shapes and sizes of the cedar vents we have in stock by clicking HERE!
While this use of cedar vents isn't wildly imaginative, I think the extra embellishments are a great addition. Who says attic vents have to be boring? How cute would this look on playhouse or tree house?
Building a coupola is a great use for these cedar vents. Coupolas look great on barns, sheds and even country houses. 
Really, is this not the cutest shelving unit ever? Make it even easier by nixing the top shelf and the unit becomes a very cute and EASY coat rack!  
Our cedar vents have small metal meshing behind the vents that can be removed, but keeping it attached and adding a rustic white paint job would make them look very farmhouse chic. Add some pictures for a unique photo keeper.
This headboard is made to look like a louvered door. But there are a few great headboard sized cedar vents that if clear coated would look awesome! Use two rectangular ones and add an arched one on top for an extra cool touch. 
These crafty homeowners used these small vents for a shower curtain valance. Because cedar is commonly used for exterior uses, cedar would work great in a bathroom!
Have some stamps dumped into a drawer? Organize and display them with cedar vents!
A Millwork Outlet exclusive idea: the new and improved business card holder. Use a cedar vent to organize and display business cards, place setting cards or photos.  
 

‘The Woodwright’s Shop’ Renewed for 2 More Seasons

‘The Woodwright’s Shop’ Renewed for 2 More Seasons

Good news, fellow knuckle-draggers. Roy Underhill’s television show, “The Woodwright’s Shop,” has been renewed for two more seasons – State Farm Insurance has agreed to fund seasons 33 and 34 of the show. Personal note: I have my home insurance through State Farm for this reason alone. My wife thinks I’m nuts for this. And Continue reading»

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