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10 Reasons NOT to Use Liquid Hide Glue for Furniture

10 Reasons NOT to Use Liquid Hide Glue for Furniture
A personal list. Your reasons may vary. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. If you rub your glue-y hands on your pants they will smell like a horse’s bum that has been boiled and then left in the sun (but the smell washes out). — Christopher Schwarz
 

Spacing Dovetails with Dividers – a Little History

Spacing Dovetails with Dividers – a Little History
I’ve always been intrigued about the history of the way some English-trained woodworkers set out their dovetail joints using dividers. I first learned to use this method – which I love – from Rob Cosman. He learned it from legendary craftsman Alan Peters. But where did Peters learn it from? I don’t know, so I’m [...]
 

Campaign Pulls from Londonderry Brasses

Campaign Pulls from Londonderry Brasses
My credit card is groaning a bit thanks to all the hardware samples I’ve been ordering to find a selection of quality brasses for some Campaign-style pieces I’m building. Today I received a chest pull that I ordered from Londonderry Brasses of Cochranville, Penn. I have some other pieces on order from Londonderry, but this [...]
 

A New Bookmark: Hardware City Tools for Totes

A New Bookmark: Hardware City Tools for Totes
When you buy vintage Stanley planes in the wild, one of the most common problems is the tote – and sometimes the knob – are trashed. My first No. 5 had a crude replacement tote that was so poorly rasped that it looked like it was furry. I’d always intended to make a replacement but [...]
 

The Case for Hidden Joinery

The Case for Hidden Joinery
When I took my first woodworking class in 1993 I was gung-ho to learn two things: through-tenons and through-dovetails. At the time I was intoxicated by Arts & Crafts furniture and exposed joinery. For many woodworkers, I suspect that exposed joinery sends a message: This piece is made well. It’s not made using corrugated fasteners, [...]
 

Making Lipped Drawers with a Dovetail Jig

Making Lipped Drawers with a Dovetail Jig

By Tom Caspar

Purchase the complete version of this technique story from AWBookstore.com.

You can do more with your half-blind dovetail jig than meets the eye. You’ve probably used it to make drawers with plain, inset fronts, but it’s really quite simple to make lipped drawer fronts, too. Even though most dovetail jigs are basically the same, some of their manuals don’t go into much detail about how to make this variation of the basic drawer (they often call it a rabbeted drawer, which is confusing). Whatever kind of jig you have, here’s a foolproof process for making lipped drawers from beginning to end.


2. Cut rabbets to form lips on the top and ends of the drawer front (usually there’s no lip on the bottom). The precise width of the rabbets affects the fit of the drawer front in its opening. Fine-tune the fence setting so there is 1/16" or less total side play between the inside of the drawer front and the sides of the case.

Click any image to view a larger version


3. Check the fit of sample dovetails made with your jig. Use the same species of wood as your drawer parts for test pieces. Wood that’s too soft gives a false reading.

Adjust the router bit up or down until you make two parts that fit together with hand pressure alone.

Adjust the jig’s template in and out until you make two parts that fit flush. The position of the template affects the depth of the sockets.


4. Place both drawer sides in the dovetail jig, inside out and front side up. Use the groove in the drawer bottom as a referen ce guide. It faces toward you and lines up with an outside finger of the dovetail template.

The bottom edge of every drawer part butts up against the stops on the jig.


5. Rout dovetails in the drawer sides. Move the router from left to right for best results. Use backer boards behind the drawer sides to prevent the backs of the tails from chipping out.


9. Dovetail one drawer side and back as a pair, making a standard half-blind joint. As in Photo 4, one pair is placed in the left-hand side of the jig and the other pair in the right-hand side. You won’t get parts mixed up if you remember that the grooves always go nearest the stops of the jig.

Sand all the inside faces of the drawer before gluing.


This story originally appeared in American Woodworker December 2000, issue #84.

December 2000, issue #84

Purchase this back issue.

Purchase the complete version of this technique story from AWBookstore.com.

 

Why You Should Visit Midwest Woodworking Co.

Why You Should Visit Midwest Woodworking Co.
In this business, there are a few things you don’t share: Finishing secrets, wood sources and saliva. This post breaks one of those three cardinal rules – revealing excellent wood sources. Last week Andy Brownell took me to a lumber supplier that has been sitting under my nose since I moved to Cincinnati in 1996. [...]
 

& Sons Campaign Hardware">Hardware Review: Ansaldi & Sons Campaign Hardware

Hardware Review: Ansaldi & Sons Campaign Hardware
While Horton Brasses has agreed to produce some custom pieces of campaign hardware for the chest/secretary I’m building for Popular Woodworking Magazine, that doesn’t squelch my desire to see what other makers have on offer. So I ordered a load of campaign brasses from Ansaldi & Sons of Hudson, N.H. The company has a wide [...]
 

A Little More on the Fork

A Little More on the Fork
After posting this story about the campaign-style fork and knife, I got an e-mail from woodworking researcher extraordinaire Jeff Burks. Burks, a trade carpenter, is a voracious collector of books, magazines and journals relating to woodworking. He also spends a lot of time researching patents related to tools and the trade. Which brings us to [...]
 

Things Woodworkers Don’t Say

Things Woodworkers Don't Say
When I hang out with other woodworkers, the conversation almost always turns to what we are building now and what we are building next. Recently I said something I didn’t think I’d ever say: “I want to build a fork.” As I’ve been digging deeper into the 250-year history of campaign furniture, I’m turning up [...]
 

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